Tag Archive for 'Citizen’s Eye'

Interview With John Coster – Audioboo


Making the Wheels Turn – Reflections on Citizens Eye

At the start of the 6th Community Media Week, I caught up with John Coster, founder of Citizens Eye and we discussed the changes and the challenges of running successful community media projects.

 

Community Media – Proper Credit?

If community media is to be given proper credit and support it needs to be embedded within courses that allow for the examination of practice and principles. What are the key issues that need to be considered when developing courses and learning opportunities associated with community media?

I’m working with John Coster of Citizens Eye [http://citizenseye.org] as part of my research work, and we’ve been discussing and testing an idea to develop formal training opportunities in community media, both within formal education settings, and as part of informal social networks and communities.

I’m looking to float and test some of the ideas a little further, and specifically the development of a pair of undergraduate modules to be offered by the Leicester Media wpid-wpid-rwm_0068-2013-06-12-11-54-2013-06-12-11-54.jpgSchool, focussing on Community Media as a set of participant-led production practices and as a vehicle for personal, civic and community development.

I’ve attached a document that gives a thumbnail outline of two modules that I hope could be offered across the LMS, one at level five for 2014 and one at level six for 2015.

I would appreciate any feedback and thoughts about the scope of the proposals, the level that they are pitched, and what forms of collaborative development within DMU – and with external partners – we might pursue?

There’s a discussion thread on The Community Media Forum. Apply to join, and any comments can be shared with other community media activists.

If you want to get a sense of the community media projects I’ve been working with, my blog has some posts and podcasts that outline some of the activities I’ve been engaged with.

http://robwatsonmedia.net/category/communitymedia/

Level 5 Community Media Production – Principles & Practices [2014/15 Delivery]

Rationale: Community and collaborative media aim to promote and develop the voices, social presence and skills of ordinary people in grassroots and marginalised communities. As a third-tier of media, outside and distinct from commercial and public sector media, community media faces a number of challenges that would otherwise limit its measurable social impact, and which make sustainability in the sector hard to achieve. This module aims to account for and critically examine the principles and regimes of community media ideas and concepts, while giving learners the opportunity to experience and develop skills as practitioners of community and collaborative media through engagement with active community media organisations.

Outcomes: At the end of this module learners will be able to demonstrate:

• An ability to use and evaluate key terms and concepts associated with community and collaborative media, and to use these terms and concepts to undertake critical assessments and interventions in debates associated with of community media practices, organisation and policy.

• An ability to develop, produce and share – responsibly and ethically – content and media products within a community media group or network.

Prerequisite: It is essential to be able to demonstrate skills in media production, collaborative and social media and critical and contextual analysis at level four.

Theme 1: Community Media Principles
Participation; community representation; civic activism, representation; grassroots organisation; alternative media; co-operative and membership association; collaborative networks; alternative voices; history of community media activism; legislative agendas; funding regimes & economic models.

Theme 2: Community Media Practices
Citizen media; sourcing stories;, hyperlocalism; communities of interest; ethical practice; staying safe; open source & free media; creative commons media; staying on the right side of the law, NCTJ diploma.

Theme 3: Community Media Case Studies
Local Media – Citizens Eye, Leicester People’s Photographic Gallery, EavaFM, Takeover Radio…
National Media – ResonanceFM, Community Media Association, Radio Regen…

Theme 4: Community Media Social Impact
Alternative voices; civic empowerment; working with marginalised people; social gain; local political activism; community regeneration.

Delivery: A combination of lectures, practical workshops and project work, utilising e-learning, collaborative media and network tools.

Level 6 Community Media Production – Development & Impact [2015/16 Delivery]

Rationale: Community and collaborative media have a global significance, being championed and promoted in many parts of the world as development platforms for the enhancement and building of personal, social and civic literacies and skills within grassroots and marginalised communities. As a third-tier of media, outside and distinct from commercial and public sector media, community media organisations can be non-governmental, ad-hoc and anti-corporate, and therefore face a number of challenges in achieving long-term sustainability. This module aims to critically examine the national and transnational policy discourse of international community media development, and will give learners the opportunity to explore how the management and organisational structures and interactions of community media can be used to promote the social gain objectives of collaborative, grassroots and networked volunteers and participants.

Outcome: At the end of this module learners will be able to demonstrate:
• An ability to use and evaluate key terms and concepts associated with international community and collaborative media development and to use these terms and concepts to undertake critical assessments and interventions in debates associated with of international community media practices, organisation and policy.

• An ability to develop, produce and share – responsibly and ethically – content and media products within an international community media group or network.

Prerequisite: It is essential to have undertaken the previous level five community media production module, unless significant acquired prior learning or experience can be demonstrated.

Theme 1: Community Media Partnerships
Working with the third-sector, local authorities, education providers, professional bodies, regulators and trusts. Networking with activist, faith & community interest groups. Challenging stereotypes & barriers between organisations, communities & people(s).

Theme 2: Community Media Volunteering & Participation
Hearing all voices; communication for volunteering; project management for voluntary groups; recognising and rewarding volunteers; hosting & moderating discussion; managing realistic expectations; building capabilities and literacies.

Theme 3: Community Media Funding & Development
Making partnerships work; forms of organisation – cooperatives and members associations; sources of mainstream & alternative income; applying for awards; ITC infrastructure development; financial management & accountability; community regeneration.

Theme 4: Community Media Global Perspectives
International networks of community media practice, research & public policy; international development goals & bodies; development challenges – building capabilities & literacies; intra- & extra-community communication; case-studies of supporting organisations – i.e. Media Trust, Unesco, European Community, BBC World Service Trust, etc.

Delivery: A combination of lectures, practical workshops and project work, utilising e-learning, collaborative media and network tools.

Community Media – Proper Credit?

If community media is to be given proper credit and support it needs to be embedded within courses that allow for the examination of practice and principles. What are the key issues that need to be considered when developing courses and learning opportunities associated with community media?

I’m working with John Coster of Citizens Eye [http://citizenseye.org] as part of my research work, and we’ve been discussing and testing an idea to develop formal training opportunities in community media, both within formal education settings, and as part of informal social networks and communities.

I’m looking to float and test some of the ideas a little further, and specifically the development of a pair of undergraduate modules to be offered by the Leicester Media School, focussing on Community Media as a set of participant-led production practices and as a vehicle for personal, civic and community development.

I’ve attached a document that gives a thumbnail outline of two modules that I hope could be offered across the LMS, one at level five for 2014 and one at level six for 2015.

I would appreciate any feedback and thoughts about the scope of the proposals, the level that they are pitched, and what forms of collaborative development within DMU – and with external partners – we might pursue?

There’s a discussion thread on The Community Media Forum. Apply to join, and any comments can be shared with other community media activists.

If you want to get a sense of the community media projects I’ve been working with, my blog has some posts and podcasts that outline some of the activities I’ve been engaged with.

http://robwatsonmedia.net/category/communitymedia/

Level 5 Community Media Production – Principles & Practices [2014/15 Delivery]

Rationale: Community and collaborative media aim to promote and develop the voices, social presence and skills of ordinary people in grassroots and marginalised communities. As a third-tier of media, outside and distinct from commercial and public sector media, community media faces a number of challenges that would otherwise limit its measurable social impact, and which make sustainability in the sector hard to achieve. This module aims to account for and critically examine the principles and regimes of community media ideas and concepts, while giving learners the opportunity to experience and develop skills as practitioners of community and collaborative media through engagement with active community media organisations.

Outcomes: At the end of this module learners will be able to demonstrate:

• An ability to use and evaluate key terms and concepts associated with community and collaborative media, and to use these terms and concepts to undertake critical assessments and interventions in debates associated with of community media practices, organisation and policy.

• An ability to develop, produce and share – responsibly and ethically – content and media products within a community media group or network.

Prerequisite: It is essential to be able to demonstrate skills in media production, collaborative and social media and critical and contextual analysis at level four.

Theme 1: Community Media Principles
Participation; community representation; civic activism, representation; grassroots organisation; alternative media; co-operative and membership association; collaborative networks; alternative voices; history of community media activism; legislative agendas; funding regimes & economic models.

Theme 2: Community Media Practices
Citizen media; sourcing stories;, hyperlocalism; communities of interest; ethical practice; staying safe; open source & free media; creative commons media; staying on the right side of the law, NCTJ diploma.

Theme 3: Community Media Case Studies
Local Media – Citizens Eye, Leicester People’s Photographic Gallery, EavaFM, Takeover Radio…
National Media – ResonanceFM, Community Media Association, Radio Regen…

Theme 4: Community Media Social Impact
Alternative voices; civic empowerment; working with marginalised people; social gain; local political activism; community regeneration.

Delivery: A combination of lectures, practical workshops and project work, utilising e-learning, collaborative media and network tools.

 

Level 6 Community Media Production – Development & Impact [2015/16 Delivery]

Rationale: Community and collaborative media have a global significance, being championed and promoted in many parts of the world as development platforms for the enhancement and building of personal, social and civic literacies and skills within grassroots and marginalised communities. As a third-tier of media, outside and distinct from commercial and public sector media, community media organisations can be non-governmental, ad-hoc and anti-corporate, and therefore face a number of challenges in achieving long-term sustainability. This module aims to critically examine the national and transnational policy discourse of international community media development, and will give learners the opportunity to explore how the management and organisational structures and interactions of community media can be used to promote the social gain objectives of collaborative, grassroots and networked volunteers and participants.

Outcome: At the end of this module learners will be able to demonstrate:
• An ability to use and evaluate key terms and concepts associated with international community and collaborative media development and to use these terms and concepts to undertake critical assessments and interventions in debates associated with of international community media practices, organisation and policy.

• An ability to develop, produce and share – responsibly and ethically – content and media products within an international community media group or network.

Prerequisite: It is essential to have undertaken the previous level five community media production module, unless significant acquired prior learning or experience can be demonstrated.

Theme 1: Community Media Partnerships
Working with the third-sector, local authorities, education providers, professional bodies, regulators and trusts. Networking with activist, faith & community interest groups. Challenging stereotypes & barriers between organisations, communities & people(s).

Theme 2: Community Media Volunteering & Participation
Hearing all voices; communication for volunteering; project management for voluntary groups; recognising and rewarding volunteers; hosting & moderating discussion; managing realistic expectations; building capabilities and literacies.

Theme 3: Community Media Funding & Development

Making partnerships work; forms of organisation – cooperatives and members associations; sources of mainstream & alternative income; applying for awards; ITC infrastructure development; financial management & accountability; community regeneration.

Theme 4: Community Media Global Perspectives
International networks of community media practice, research & public policy; international development goals & bodies; development challenges – building capabilities & literacies; intra- & extra-community communication; case-studies of supporting organisations – i.e. Media Trust, Unesco, European Community, BBC World Service Trust, etc.

Delivery: A combination of lectures, practical workshops and project work, utilising e-learning, collaborative media and network tools.

Hosting a Community Media Cafe

With over three years’ experience running drop-in café’s for community media, John Coster knows the ins and the outs well. As the founder of Citizen’s Eye, John has been meeting volunteers and activists from the community media groups and charities in Leicester to help connect people. The community media cafes are not only a chance for volunteers to share their experience about how they can develop their projects, it’s also a social platform in which it’s possible to meet people with a like-mind and a common passion for community media and social enhancement.

At today’s Community Media Hub session at BBC Leicester, John explained how to get the best out of hosting a community media café, how to make it a social event rather than a formal event, and how to make it as accessible to a wide range of people. Simple things like pushing tables together and having a badge can make all the difference, according to John. Make sure that people are welcomed when they come in. Try and do a deal with the café manager to have a discount for people attending the media café, but be sure to help the cafe by holding the event at a time when they aren’t that busy.

Community media cafés are a regular occurrence in Leicester, and coming along has helped me to widen my circle of contacts and friends, and to talk to other people who are passionate about community media. If you’ve never been to one, but fancy trying one out, just pop along to Coffee Republic on Granby Street in Leicester, every Tuesday 9.30-10.30.

My Community Media Week

PE_YYYY0805142350This week has been quite exhilarating. I’ve packed more community media projects into one week than I have done for ages. It started off on Monday when I was helping Ian Davies at Leicester People’s Photographic Gallery to hang the new exhibition. I love the process of managing the turn-over of an exhibition. I arrived at the gallery at 10am, only to find that Ian had been there since 6.30am. He’d taken down the previous exhibition and had hung half of the images of the next exhibition. So my role was to make tea and to assist in the hanging of the second-half of the exhibition. Then in the evening was the opening for the work of Chris Hanrahan, and his street photography. Despite a very heavy rain storm the opening was really well attended. After vacuum cleaning the gallery, and when the preview got underway, I spent time getting people to sign a board with messages for Chris about what they thought of his images and exhibition. Eventually I got home for 9pm, exhausted but feeling really great about how the volunteers at the gallery had been able to pull together to create such a successful exhibition.

 

PE_YYYY0806094952On Tuesday morning, after a refreshing swim, I got to the regular Citizen’s Eye Community News Cafe run by John Coster. There was a really good attendance, with loads of people chatting with each other about their community media projects over a coffee. These sessions are a very welcome way to keep in contact with the network of community media activist in Leicester and are refreshing because they are open to all. After popping back home because I’d forgotten some leads it was off to BBC Leicester for the Community Media Hub sessions. It’s a real achievement that John has been able to network with BBC Leicester to provide a regular venue for the community media hub sessions. This has enabled Mike Lane and myself to start a small test project of audio-drama mentoring workshops using the BBC Leicester studios to work from. At the same time I was due to deliver a presentation on podcasting to the hub participants. I really enjoyed sharing my experience of making audio reports and recordings for podcasts. The hour went by in a whirl.

PE_YYYY0807115709On Wednesday Ian Davies and I travelled to Manchester to network with some community media groups and art galleries. We chatted with Hwa Young Jung of the Manchester Digital Lab about how they have developed a grassroots network of tech and creative media groups in Manchester. This was inspirational stuff. There’s no one throwing money at the projects, but the sense that this was being built from the ground-up was palpable. Later we chatted with Cormac Lawler about his work with Radio Regen and the challenges that are being faced by community media groups as funding from local authorities has dried-up. Our last stop in Manchester was at the Corner House, which is one of my favourite arts venues. We chatted with Marisa Draper, who was very welcoming and supportive of what Ian is developing in Leicester.

PE_YYYY0808132727After a short hop on the train to Liverpool we headed for the University of Liverpool halls of residence – which are great places to find cheap rooms for summer-time visits. After a bite to eat I showed Ian two of my favourite bars, the Kazimier Gardens and the Roscoe Head. But there was no late night partying, because the pair of us where knackered. The next morning things went a little awry, as our contact for a later visit was pushed back to the afternoon. However, we used the time to look at some of the contemporary galleries that Liverpool has to offer. Unfortunately the galleries in FACT don’t open until 12pm, so we went for a tea at the Bluecoat Gallery. It was lucky that we where in that spot at that time. A chap fell down a couple of steps and cut a gash in his hand on a broken cup. Ian’s A&E nursing training kicked-in and he was able to offer immediate assistance. So our inconvenience came to good use in the end.

Next on the trail was Tate Liverpool in the Albert Dock. It’s amazing how much Liverpool has changed in recent years, with loads of tourists wandering about looking very relaxed and very engaged with the city. The Pier Head is a great place to chill out and take street photographs before we paid our visit to the Open Eye Gallery, where we chatted with Jill Carruthers about her experience of promoting and co-ordinating the work of up-and-coming photographers.

Looking back on the week, then it’s been pretty hectic, with lots of travelling, lots of thinking and a lots of talking. I jet hope I can make sense of it all when I sit down to figure out what it’s all about.