TECH1502 Lecture Eleven Summary

This is a short overview of the topics that are being covered in the eleventh lecture for TECH1502 Introduction to Community Media.

TECH2503 Lecture Ten Summary

Here’s the latest video summary of the topics that will be covered in the tenth lecture for TECH2503 Community Media Production.

TECH1502 Lecture Ten Summary

This is an overview of the topics that will be covered in the tenth lecture for TECH1502 Introduction to Community Media.

TECH2503 Lecture Nine Summary

This is a short overview of the topics that will be covered in the ninth lecture for TECH2503 Community Media Production.

Round the Counter Podcast Number Thirteen – Gaming & Energy Drinks

This is our Round the Counter podcast discussion for TECH3022 Advanced Social Media Production, in which we talk about gaming and the association with energy drinks. There’s a good article by Duncan Aird from way back in 2010 that explains this phenomenon, and from which I’ve used one of Duncan’s pictures.

TECH1502 Lecture Nine Summary

This is a short overview of the topics that are covered in the ninth lecture for TECH1502 Introduction to Community Media.

TECH2503 Lecture Eight Summary

This is a short overview of the issues that will be covered in the eighth lecture for TECH2503 Community Media Production.

TECH1502 Lecture Eight Summary

This is a short overview of the key topics that will be covered in the eighth lecture for TECH1502 Introduction to Community Media.

TECH1002 Coursework B & C Overview

This is a brief overview of the coursework B & C for TECH1002 Social Media Production.

TECH2503 Lecture Seven Summary

This is a short overview of the topics covered in the seventh lecture for TECH2503 Community Media Production.

TECH1502 Lecture Seven Summary

This is a short overview of the topics that will be covered in the seven lecture for TECH1502 Introduction to Community Media.

TECH1002 Coursework A Feedback Video

This is a short summary of the feedback for TECH1002 Social Media & Technology Coursework A.

TECH1002 Lecture Eleven Summary

This is an overview of the topics that will be covered in the eleventh lecture for TECH1002 Social Media & Technology.

TECH1002 Lecture Ten Summary

This is a short overview of the main topics that will be covered in the tenth lecture for TECH1002 Social Media & Technology.

TECH1002 Lecture Nine Summary

This is a short video summary of the ninth lecture for TECH1002 Social Media & Technology.

TECH1002 Lecture Eight Summary

This is a short introduction of the main topics covered in the eighth lecture for TECH1002 Social Media & Technology.

TECH1002 Lecture Seven Summary

This is a short video summary of the seventh lecture for TECH1002 Social Media & Technology.

TECH2503 Lecture Five Summary

This is a short video that outlines the main topics that will be covered in the fifth lecture for TECH2503 Community Media Production.

TECH1502 Lecture Five Summary

This is a short summary of the topics that will be covered in the fifth TECH1502 Lecture about Community Media and examples of forms of community media.

TECH2503 Lecture Four Summary

This is a short summary of the main issues that will be covered in the fourth lecture for TECH2503 Community Media Production.

Round the Counter Podcast Number Eight

Here’s the latest edition of the Round the Counter Podcast. Lots of aimless chat with myself, Dave Weight and Ben Archer. Just chatting about stuff that we can’t be bothered to look in to in more detail?

TECH1502 Lecture Four Summary

This is a short presentation summarising the main topics that will be covered in the fourth lecture for TECH1502 Introduction to Community Media.

Dislocation and the Aftermath

The Art Exchange in Nottingham are showing two excellent exhibitions this weekend. The first is Fighting Walls – Street Art in Egypt and Iran, which explores how urban art is used to challenge the perceptions of the people of these authoritarian cities. “Tehran and Cairo are largely dominated by state ideological narratives,” though in recent years “a new generation of politically engaged graffiti artists have started a relentless battle for reclaiming ownership of the street.”

The images are striking and provoking, both in the context of the streets that they have been painted, but also in the context of the gallery space, where they are shown simply as photographic prints that are pasted to the concrete walls of the exhibition room, taking away that feeling of separation that normally accompanies art-works on a gallery wall.

[See image gallery at robwatsonmedia.net]

The second exhibition is the work of Jimmy Cauty, and consists of a full-size storage container that is fitted with peep-holes, enabling the visitor to find out what is inside. The Aftermath Dislocation Principle consists of a post-riot scene in which police officers in fluorescent jackets are the only remaining people. The views that the peep-holes give us are selective views of a model that represents an urban British cityscape in the midst of civil unrest and a violent meltdown.

The views that the peep-holes give us are selective views of a model that represents an urban British cityscape in the midst of civil unrest and a violent meltdown. The riot has moved on, and its effects are felt and recorded in the miniature scenes being played out.

It’s an interesting dynamic between the two sets of work. On the one hand, the street art depicts a series of  provocative interventions into a reality that  is defined in stone and concrete walls, while on the other hand, The Aftermath depicts only the traces of the riot and its signs, showing only the traces of the act and not the act itself.

Both works are literally fascinating as they test the viewer to accommodate the shifts and changes in perception that they represent. Jimmy Cauty gave a talk about the origins of the piece and how the process of collaboration has been incorporated into its production.

Both are invigorating, catch them when you can.

TECH2503 Lecture Summary Two

This is a short video summary of the main issues that will be covered in the lecture for TECH2503 Community Media Production.

TECH1502 Lecture Two Video Summary

This is a short video summary of the issues that will be covered in the second lecture for TECH1502 Introduction to Community Media.

TECH1002 Workshop 002 Video Summary

This is a short overview of the activities that we will be covering in the second workshop for TECH1002.

TECH1002 Lecture Five Video Summary

This is a short overview of the topics that will be covered in the fifth lecture for TECH1002 Social Media & Technology.

TECH1002 Lecture Four Video Summary

This is a short video summary of the topics that will be covered in the fourth lecture for TECH1002 Social Media & Technology.

TECH1002 Lecture Three Video Summary

This is a short video summary of the topics that will be covered in the third lecture for TECH1002 Social Media & Technology.

TECH1002 Lecture Two Video Summary

This video gives a brief overview of the issues that will be covered in the second lecture for TECH1002 Social Media & Technology.

TECH3022 Lecture 004 Video Summary

This video gives a short overview of the topics discussed in the fourth lecture for TECH3022 Advanced Social Media Production.

TECH3022 Lecture 003 Video Summary

This is a short video introduction to the issues that we will be covering in the third lecture for TECH3022 Advanced Social Media Production.

TECH3022 Lecture Summary Number Two

This is a short video that gives an overview of the topic covered in the second lecture for TECH3022 Advanced Social Media Production.

TECH1502 Workshop Week One Video Introduction

This is a short video that outlines what we’ll be doing in the first workshop for TECH1502 Introduction to Community Media.

TECH1002 Workshop Introduction Number One

Here’s a short video I’ve posted about the first workshop sessions for TECH1002.

TECH3022 Advanced Social Media Production Intro Number One

This video gives an introduction to the first lecture and workshop of TECH3022 Advanced Social Media Production.

TECH2503 Community Media Production Intro Number One

This video gives an introduction to the first lecture session for TECH2503 Community Media Production

TECH1002-17 Lecture Overview Number One

This is my latest video introduction for TECH1002-17 Lecture Number One.

Planning Community Media Modules Over Coffee

I met with John Coster yesterday to discuss how we will be running the Community Media modules that are art of the BA Communication Arts course in Leicester Media School. It’s great to have John on board helping with the module as he brings years of experience running community media projects and working with community media groups in Leicester.

The learners are going to benefit from someone who has direct, first-hand experience of what it’s like to challenge mainstream media, and who has imagined an alternative way of producing media that is better suited to the lives of people who form vastly different communities in Leicester.

One of the changes I’m making to the running of the first year community media module this year, is to split the workshops back to a more traditional format. Last year I incorporated the lecture and the workshop in one session, but I felt that we never really covered enough background and contextual information in the process.

So John will be running the workshops and I will be developing the lectures. We want the workshops to feel very informal and relaxed, much like a community media café session is run. It’s surprising how much work you can get done, and how many questions get asked when there isn’t a strong agenda for the session.

Yeas, we’ve identified several things that we want to happen in each of the sessions, but if there’s something else more pressing that the learners want to explore, then we’ll cover that instead.

The themes of the lectures are going to identify the basics of community media, in terms of both thinking about why community media is different to mainstream media, but also how our sense of community has also changed as society has changed. Here I’m thinking of Robert Putnam and his analysis in Bowling Alone.

The aim of an introduction to community media is therefore twofold. One the one hand it is to help people to feel comfortable with the idea of self-produced media – what gets called citizen’s journalism or user generated content by media industry insiders. While on the other hand, it’s about developing an appreciation of why community media is different.

The simple premise of community media is expressed in the idea that it is people speaking for themselves, in ways that they and the other people in their community find meaningful. This might not be very business-like, professional or cutting edge, but it’s forms of media that emerge from the grassroots, and which have a strong focus on DIY.

So we’ll be encouraging learners to have a go at making basic media content, with no fancy production values, no sophisticated equipment, and no wider sense that we expect it to please anyone other than ourselves.

This way we can be free of the weight of expectation that media has to be planned for an audience, or that it has to serve a function. If we like it, and the students and volunteers like it, and make sense of it, then that’s all for the best.

I’m going to try and post a blog as often as I can that shows how we are getting on with these ideas. We’ll make a couple of podcasts and a few YouTube videos as well. After having fun with the media that we create is what this will be about.

Post-Brexit – The Generation That Bottled It

The Brexit crisis has turned out to be a rather impressive psychodrama. A drama that has polarised opinion on each side of the debate. Unpicking the consequences of the Brexit decision is going to take some time, and it won’t be easy to make sense of things for a while.

What was once up is now down, what was once certain is now unknown, and what was once predictable has become chaotic. The political polarities have shifted for sure. Finding out what this means in practice is going to take some time and some creative thinking.

Understanding what the emerging principles of this shift in our assumed reality is going to be much more difficult than the first batch of comment and analysis in the newspapers suggests. But understanding this shift will be key to successful political representation and debate in the United Kingdom for years to come.

Which side are you on, the fifty-two or the forty-eight? This is going to be the defining polarity in British politics and economics for some time to come.

If we are pragmatic in our approach to understanding what has gone on, we might find it useful to think of the debate as a set of interlocking translation issues. Two groups of people had assumed that they had been talking the same language and describing the same things.

It turns out that they had different things in mind, and had been using different frameworks of meaning that couldn’t be comprehended by the other side.

On the one hand there is a tendency for the Brexit result to be boiled down to an easy and straight forward sense of either spite or optimism. Or that the decision can be played out as a battle of inter-generational conflict, in which one generation pulls-up the ladder on a following generation.

There is a lot of evidence to support the view of the selfish generation making it harder for the next generation in practice, just look at the levels of inequality in the United Kingdom, but this is more of a consequence than a direct intent on the part of the Brexit supporters.

Likewise, the result can be broken down into a tension between the nostalgic or the optimistic. Those people who have no memory of the past afflictions of de-industrialisation, or the class war wrought by successive governments, or the shift and change in technology and the global economy, have been shunted sideways by a generation that can only think about how badly they have been treated.

Is this a forty year grudge.

There was a telling interview on BBC Radio Four’s Today Program earlier this week. Two women were interviewed, one who regretted her decision, and one who was confirmed in her decision. The woman who regretted voting leave said that she realised she had been holding a grudge for forty years, but that it was now too late to change her mind as her vote had been cast.

The other woman was clear, she had researched and read about the issue of the European Union and felt confident about her decision. She told the interviewer that she was against globalisation, but that the decision to support Brexit would make it easier for the United Kingdom to trade internationally.

This made me choke. The kind of choke and splutter that good radio can achieve on occasions. Quite what does she thinks globalisation is? Has she not understood that trading internationally is globalisation? How can she keep these two contradictory positions in her mind and resolve them?

How does she cope with the cognitive dissonance that she is grappling with?

This faulty logic is where we will find the answer to these issues. This will take some perceptive listening, some creative thinking, and some alternative methods of analysis to come up with a working solution that helps people to make sense of their predicament.

The on-going question, indeed the only question that will dominate British politics is concerned with how we go about building strong local identities, how we empower people locally, while accommodating international trade and global identity?

Where I think a useful place to look for an answer is somewhat counter-intuitive. Is the Brexit decision better thought of as a failure of nerve and resolve, rather than an embrace of the future and confidence in collective international action?

Clearly the Brexit result is a symptom and not the cause of a bigger problem. Is Brexit the result of one generation getting spooked because life felt like it was moving forward and getting too easy, when they felt that it should be hard?

People have said this is like a divorce, but actually the divorce happened a long time ago. This is one partner realising that their former partner has no need for them, so they are perplexed because their former lover seem to be getting on with their lives, meeting new people and generally having a nice time.

The disdainful ex-partner finds this difficult to deal with, and therefore wants to spite their former partner so that they feel as bad as they do about life. Why should they be out and about meeting people when we are sat at home staring out of the window?

There is a strong underlying current in British life that can’t believe that things can ever be so good. Because life should never be good, according to the puritan mind-set of struggle and toil. You have to work hard to get what you want. You have to be prudent and cut your cloth. Life shouldn’t feel this easy?

The ethic of the British mind-set is very often driven by a puritan impulse that seeks suffering and graft as virtues in themselves, regardless of how useful they turn out to be in practice, or the alternative, smarter ways of doing things that exist.

This mind-set is based on the misconception that the pleasures that life brings should be denied, for a greater virtue is awaited elsewhere, and is a reward for deferred gratification and ease now. John Maynard Keynes called this the Electromagnetic Problem – forcing your family to walk everywhere because the battery in the car is faulty, and so you scrap the whole car rather than just replacing the battery.

Puritans will tell you that learning, knowledge, information, association and participation shouldn’t feel easy. Surely they are difficult and challenging. Surely they are things that we have to work hard for. Surely those people who have the rewards in life got them because they earned them, and not because they where in the right place at the right time, just being lucky?

Our politicians and the news media have promoted the view that life is about tough decisions and that if dealing with things is easy then it is wrong. This is because the best way to keep what you have is to normalise the luck that brought it about and promote the myth that you got it through hard work and industry, when it was the result of the lottery of life.

Keep in mind that the lottery of life in the United Kingdom as been eschewed and knocked out of kilter for generations now. There is less opportunity for social mobility than ever before, and wealth never seems to trickle down the ladder as it was promised.

The Brexit vote, then, is a turning point in people’s sense of imaginative possibility – between the seemingly difficult and the seemingly easy. This is a turning point in which the older generation, by-and-large, bottled it.

They bottled it because they haven’t been able to adapt to the mind-set that internationalism and globalisation brings. What, we need to put a framework in place for cooperation and collaboration? What, we have to engage in international politics and win people over to our ideas? Sorry, our splendid isolation seems enough, why worry about the rest of the world when we can just look after ourselves?

They bottled it because they don’t understand how communication technology is stripping away national barriers, and allowing people to associate more freely.

Google Translate

Google Translate

Look at Google Translate and think about the power of technology to change our worldview. The Google Translate app on the iPhone has a live camera function, allowing the user to read the text in a sign as the words are translated in-situ.

They bottled it because they can’t understand that they had to turn-up and play a role in creating their own destinies, building their own communities, and enhancing their own sense of civic participation through which they could gain a sense of self-actualised identity.

There is an assumption that we need strong leadership in the United Kingdom to get things done. But this is simply people passing-off responsibility for their actions onto someone else. It’s not my problem guv!

If you want to live in a world in which learning feels hard and a chore, then you might want to invest in barriers, tariffs and vaults to protect your investments. If you think that learning is fun, creative and social, then you will want to break those barriers down.

The greatest question of our lifetimes shows that one generation has bottled-it in the face of these changes.

What is essential, though, is that TINA (There is no alternative) is now dead as a political maxim.

There is an alternative and people can choose it now if they want.

So be careful what you wish for if you thought that by voting for Brexit  you would be getting something back that you had been familiar with but estranged from.

The 48%

The 48%

Brexit empowers both ways, and your former partner is now well aware that all bets are off, and that alternatives are now open for discussion.

We in the forty-eight percent are free to choose what we want, without any feelings of responsibility for the people they are leaving behind. Bonne Voyage!